Twitter Reacts to ‘Allen v. Farrow’ Finale: “Just Start Saying Pedophile”

3

After four harrowing episodes, HBO’s Allen v. Farrow has come to an end. Using previously unseen footage and exclusive interviews, the docuseries revisits the allegations against Woody Allen that were made by his daughter, Dylan Farrow. After the premiere of its last episode on Sunday, March 14, many took to Twitter to react.

Allen v. Farrow covered a lot of ground in its finale. The nearly hour and a half-long conclusion revealed why the allegations against Woody Allen were never brought to criminal trial. Dispelling the myth that the trial never happened because there wasn’t enough evidence, Connecticut State Attorney Frank S. Maco explains that he didn’t move the trial forward for fear of retraumatizing the still young Dylan Farrow. The finale also explored the toy train controversy.

Defenders of Woody Allen have often pointed to an electric train set in an attempt to poke holes in Dylan Farrow’s story. During her retelling of what happened in 1992, Dylan Farrow has maintained that there was a train set in the attic where her father allegedly assaulted her. Many have claimed that there was no train set in the attic, including Dylan’s brother Moses Farrow. That inconsistency has long been pointed to as proof that Dylan Farrow either imagined her account or was coached. As Allen v. Farrow proves, there was in fact a train set in the attic that day.

Other viewers and celebrities were less focused on the specifics of the case and more focused on the effect of the docuseries overall:

Throughout the docuseries run, Dylan Farrow has also been vocal on social media. On Sunday night she tweeted out a thank you to all of those who watched the docuseries as well as a link to resources for survivors:

Since Allen v. Farrow premiered, the docuseries has inspired controversy. Seeing as how this case has divided public opinion for decades, that’s unsurprising. In 1992 the allegation was made that Woody Allen had sexually abused his adopted daughter, Dylan Farrow. That allegation, made by the pediatrician who examined the young Dylan, led to investigations being launched in both New York and Connecticut. Allen then countersued Mia Farrow in an attempt to get custody rights to his children Dylan Farrow, Ronan Farrow, and Moses Farrow.

Throughout the ’90s Allen’s claims of his innocence have been well documented by the press. They have continued in the age of Allen v. Farrow. Shortly after the docuseries’ premiere, Allen and his wife Soon-Yi Previn issued a statement against the series, calling it a “hatchet job.” The series was also involved in another controversy after it used  the audiobook of Allen’s own memoir, Apropos of Nothing. Tony Lyons, President of Skyhorse Publishing, claimed that using segments of the book constituted “copyright infringement.” The filmmakers countered, saying they were allowed to use the audiobook due to the Fair Use doctrine. In turn Skyhorse Publishing has stated that it will be “contemplating” legal action but will wait until after the entire series has premiered.

Though it seems Dylan Farrow is finally being taken seriously in the wake of this series and the #MeToo movement, one thing remains clear. Just as the case between Allen v. Farrow haunted us in the 1990s, it continues to haunt us to this day.

Watch Allen v. Farrow on HBO NOW and HBO Max

View original post